CRISPR-Babies in the News

It’s been a week of fast and furious headlines as the news of the first “CRISPR babies” spreads since the original announcement by MIT Technology Review on 11/25/18. It’s been fascinating to watch how different media cover the story. It will be interesting to see if he public ultimately embraces the technological advance or meets it with a collective shrug. (Preliminary news analysis by ANYA filmmaker, anthropologist Carylanna Taylor).

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Genetically Modified People Are Walking Among Us

“It felt as if humanity had crossed an important line: In China, a scientist named He Jiankui announced on Monday that twins had been born in November with a gene that he had edited when they were embryos. But in some ways this news is not new at all. A few genetically modified people already walk among us.” Carl Zimmer (New York Times) goes on to remind us of a few of these cases, three-parent embryos through “mitochondrial replacement therapy.”

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We’re overdue for a society-wide conversation about this technology.

In the Washington Post, J. Benjamin Hurlbut, Sheila Jasanoff,  and Krishanu Saha hold the scientific community partly responsible the gene-editing “experiment that was not supposed to happen.” It’s a helpful summary of where the news of the possible first "CRISPR babies” by Dr. He Jiankui (pictured) and his team fits into current scientific consensus or lack thereof.

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The worst-case scenarios of CRISPR gene editing, according to Hollywood

“A scientist in China has dominated headlines this week with the claim that his research team has successfully created the world’s first genetically-edited babies. If true, the experiment raises a lot of difficult ethical questions—ones that mainstream films and TV shows have been exploring for decades.

The topic of genetic engineering is so prevalent in pop culture that it’s practically a genre unto itself. At the heart of these science fiction depictions is the issue of whether the benefits of genetic engineering—that is, potentially curing diseases—outweigh the colossal risks, which range from eugenics to unintended mutations.” (Adam Epstein, Quartz)

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Bloomberg Quicktake: Gene Editing

Looking to get up to speed fast on the news of the first gene-edited human embryo? Take a look at this accessible and informative overview for Bloomberg. My quick take on the subtext of John Lauerman’s article and Freya Ingrid Morales’s image? There are a lot of people in business and politics eager to make sense of this news.

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Chinese scientists are creating CRISPR babies

In this MIT Technology Review piece by Antonio Regalado, “[a] daring effort is under way to create the first children whose DNA has been tailored using gene editing.”

Like the characters in ANYA, scientists are grappling with the ethics of this breakthrough technology.

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Can DNA Testing Change Your Identity?

Ruth Padawer’s piece in The New York Times Magazine — “Sigrid Johnson Was Black. A DNA Test Said She Wasn’t.”— shows “[t]he surge in popularity of services like 23andMe and Ancestry means that more and more people are unearthing long-buried connections and surprises in their ancestry.” With both services offering deep “Black Friday” discounts ($49 and $59 respectively) to encourage holiday gifting, DYI genetics testing is bound to get more popular and to unearth more quandaries like Sigrid’s.

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